Spectators boo President Trump as he pays respects to Ruth Bader Ginsburg

President Donald Trump was booed Thursday as he paid respects to late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Thursday morning, just two days before he announces his nominee to replace her on the high court.

He plans to nominate a replacement this weekend for the liberal justice, best known for her advancement of women’s rights.

The president and first lady Melania Trump — both wearing masks — stood silently at the top of the steps of the court and looked down at Ginsburg’s flag-draped coffin, which was surrounded by white flowers. Ginsburg’s death has sparked a controversy over the political balance of the court just weeks before the November presidential election.

Related: Nation says farewell to late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

As his motorcade returned to the White House, there were also chants of “Breonna Taylor” from some spectators standing on the sidewalk. Their calls came one day after it was announced that a Kentucky grand jury had brought no charges against Louisville police for her killing during a drug raid connected to a suspect who did not live at Taylor’s home.

U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump pay their respects to Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's flag-draped casket on the Lincoln catafalque on the west front of the U.S. Supreme Court September 24, 2020 in Washington, DC. A pi

Trump has called Ginsburg an “amazing woman.” Her body will lie in state at the Capitol on Friday, the first time a woman receives that distinction, and only the second time it will be bestowed on a Supreme Court justice. William Howard Taft, who had also served as president, was also recognized in such a manner. The body of Rosa Parks, a private citizen and not a government official, previously has lain in honor at the Capitol.

Related: Justice Ginsburg's death puts Roe v. Wade on the ballot in November

Ginsburg will be buried alongside her husband, Martin, in a private ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery next week. Martin Ginsburg died in 2010.

Meanwhile, the president is expected to announce his nominee to replace Ginsburg on Saturday. He has said he will select from a list of five women. Republicans are working to move quickly to a confirmation vote, possibly even before the Nov. 3 election.