Good Day Atlanta viewer information June 22, 2020

Cooling down from the summer heat at Cremalosa:

Summer just officially began on Saturday, but we’ve already experienced our fair share of hot and humid days in North Georgia this year.  And since temperatures will likely only go up from here, we decided to chill out a bit with a trip to one of Metro Atlanta’s coolest new hot spots.

Cremalosa is a Decatur gelato shop owned and operated by Meridith Ford, whose career has taken her from pastry chef to food critic to gelato master and business owner.  Ford opened the shop in February of 2020 — and was immediately faced with the challenging task of running a business during the coronavirus pandemic.  After serving customers through to-go pints for nearly three months, Ford was finally able to allow customers back to the shop in late May, providing patio seating for those in need of something sweet.  Current hours are 2:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays.

Now, let’s talk about the gelato!  First of all, how does it differ from ice cream?  “The main thing that makes it different from ice cream is the amount of air that is churned into it during the churning process, so it's freezing and churning at the same time,” says Ford.  "Lots less air is added, which keeps it a lot more smooth, a lot less dense."  Ford spins her flavors in-store on a machine imported from Italy, and uses farm-fresh ingredients.  That means the menu changes based on what’s in-season and available; recent offerings have included Pistachio and Stracciatella (both traditional Italian options), Cherry Baby, Hazelnut, and Banana Pudding.  Ford posts the daily flavors on the Cremalosa Facebook page, and the menu includes sorbetto, shakes, and other specialty treats along with the gelato.

Cremalosa is located at 2657 E. College Avenue in Decatur — for a peek inside, click the video player to check out our morning inside this very “cool” new local hangout.

Dr. Neil Winawer joins us to answer the latest Coronavirus questions:  The global Coronavirus pandemic is reaching new heights this morning, with nearly ten million confirmed cases around the world.  Dr. Neil Winawer from Emory University Hospital joins us with the latest trends. For more information on Dr. Neil Winawer or his Q&A on Instagram follow him @NeilWinawer 

Mark Owens from Star 94.1's Jenn & Friends joins us via Skype:  For more information on Mark Owens click here. 

Kyma's Chef Pano Karastassos joins us from Kyma with a braised lamb and roasted tomatoes recipe:  He's the author of Modern Greek Cooking and has even beat Bobby Flay on the show "Beat Bobby Flay."  He is sharing one his braised lamb and roasted tomatoes in thieves' purses recipes with viewers.  See recipe below.  For more on Chef Pano Karastassos or Kyma click here. 

Braised Lamb and Roasted Tomatoes
in Thieves’ Purses
Food served in a tied paper or plastic pouch or a crepe is called a “beggar’s purse” in
English. In Greece, however, it’s kleftiko, which means “thief’s purse.” In this recipe,
the components—braised lamb shanks, roasted plum tomatoes, fried fingerling potatoes, and confit garlic cloves—are first cooked separately, then united in transparent
Fata paper, which makes for a dramatic presentation. 

Four 1-pound (500 g) lamb shanks,
trimmed (see Notes)
Kosher salt and freshly ground white pepper
½ cup (125 ml) canola oil
1 pound (500 g) Vidalia (sweet) onions,
thinly sliced
2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
5 thyme sprigs
6 cups (1.5 L) chicken stock
4 small plum tomatoes (1 pound/500 g
total), quartered lengthwise
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus
more for drizzling
1 teaspoon dried oregano
4 fingerling potatoes, each about 2.5 inches
(5 cm) long
1 teaspoon black peppercorns
1 bay leaf
8 cloves of Garlic Confit (page 219)
4 sheets Fata paper (see Notes)
Chopped parsley, for sprinkling
Fleur de sel and micro herbs, for garnish

1. Heat the oven to 325°F (165°C). Season the lamb with kosher salt and pepper. In a large skillet, heat ¼ cup (60 ml) of the canola oil until shimmering. Add the lamb, in batches if needed, and cook over medium-high heat until browned on all sides, about 15 minutes. Transfer the lamb to a large enameled castiron casserole

2. Add 3 cups (300 g) of the onions, the sliced garlic, and 4 thyme sprigs to the skillet and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the aromatics to the lamb along with the stock. Press a parchment paper lid on top, cover, and bring to a simmer. Transfer the pot to the oven and cook the lamb, turning it once, until a cake tester slides easily into the meat, 1½ to 3½ hours. Remove the pot from the oven and let cool. Increase the oven temperature to 350°F (175°C).

3. Transfer the lamb to a carving board and pull the meat off the bones; discard the bones. Strain the braising liquid through a fine sieve into a medium bowl, pressing on the solids, and skim off the fat; discard the solids in the sieve.

4. Set a rack on a rimmed baking sheet. Arrange the tomatoes on the rack cut side up. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, season with kosher salt, pepper, and the oregano, and roast until the tomatoes are tender but still hold their shape, 20 to 30 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool. Keep the oven on.

5. In a small saucepan, cover the potatoes, peppercorns, bay leaf, and remaining 1 thyme sprig with cold water and bring to a boil. Cook over medium-high heat until tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Drain and let cool slightly, then halve the potatoes lengthwise. Discard the aromatics.

6. In a medium skillet, heat the remaining ¼ cup (60 ml) of canola oil until shimmering. Add the potatoes cut side down and cook over medium-high heat until golden brown on the bottom, 3 to 5 minutes. Turn the potatoes over, add the Garlic Confit, and cook until the garlic cloves are lightly browned, 2 to 3 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the potatoes and garlic cloves to a paper towel–lined plate. Wipe out the skillet.

7. Warm the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil in the same skillet. Add the remaining 2 cups (200 g) of onions. Season with kosher salt and pepper and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally, until caramelized, 20 to 25 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to a paper towel–lined plate.

8. Cut the Fata paper (see Notes) into four about 20 minutes. Transfer each pouch to a plate or a serving bowl. Cut the pouches open just below the string. Drizzle with olive oil, garnish with fleur de sel and micro herbs, and serve.

NOTES This is a fun recipe to eat right out of the bag. Cut the pouches open in front of your guests or pass around the scissors so they can cut their own. Alternatively, if you tie the bags like you do your shoes, your guests can open them easily with the pull of a string. Don’t have lamb shanks for this recipe? Substitute 2 pounds (1 kg) boneless lamb shoulder or lamb leg, cut into 1½-inch (4 cm) pieces. The meat cooks until it’s falling-off-the-bone tender. Fata paper is a clear film you can heat to up to 400°F. It is sold in rolls and sheets and can be
purchased online.
VARIATIONS
The lamb shanks can be replaced with pork shanks, pork butt, or a braising cut of beef, such as chuck or short ribs. Or try a whole chicken or chicken parts, but reduce the cooking time to about 1 hour.

MAKE AHEAD The lamb can be prepared through Step 2 and refrigerated in the braising liquid for up to 5 days. The roasted tomatoes can be refrigerated for up to 3 days. SERVE WITH As appetizers.


20-inch (50 cm) squares. Working with 1 square at a time, push the paper into a small glass measuring cup to make it easy
to fill. Add ½ cup (90 g) of the lamb, then layer 2 tomato quarters, 1 potato half, 1 confit garlic clove, and one-fourth of the caramelized onions on top. Repeat layering the lamb, tomatoes, potato, and garlic (no onions).

Sprinkle with parsley and pour in ¼ cup (60 ml) of the braising liquid. Using kitchen string, tie the paper into a pouch.

9. Set the pouches in a large shallow baking pan and fill with ¼ inch (6 mm) of hot water. Transfer to the oven and bake until hot, about 20 minutes. Transfer each pouch to a plate or a serving bowl. Cut the pouches open just below the string. Drizzle with olive oil, garnish with fleur de sel and micro herbs,
and serve.

NOTES This is a fun recipe to eat right out of the bag. Cut the pouches open in front of your guests or pass around the scissors so they can
cut their own. Alternatively, if you tie the bags like you do your shoes, your guests can open them easily with the pull of a string. Don’t have lamb shanks for this recipe? Substitute 2 pounds (1 kg) boneless lamb shoulder or lamb leg, cut into 1½-inch (4 cm) pieces.
The meat cooks until it’s falling-off-the-bone tender. Fata paper is a clear film you can heat to up to 400°F. It is sold in rolls and sheets and can be purchased online.