Thousands protest Trump's immigration order in downtown Minneapolis

- Thousands of people showed up outside the Federal Building in downtown Minneapolis Tuesday evening to protest President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration and refugees. The Anti-War Committee organized the protest. 

The protesters are marching from the Federal Building through the streets of downtown and back. 

The protest started around 4:30 p.m. A spokesperson from the Anti-War Committee explains the group wants to send a message to President Trump and stand in solidarity with their immigrant sisters and brothers.

"We have called this protest to send a loud message of NO to President Trump and of solidarity with our immigrant sisters and brothers.  We will not be silent as Trump promotes anti-Muslim bigotry. It is criminal for the U.S. to bomb and attack other countries and then turn away refugees when the U.S. has destroyed their homelands.  It is outrageous for Trump to consider doing this while at the same time planning to expand the war in Iraq and Syria!" Meredith Aby-Keirstead said.

The protest ended around 7 p.m. and all streets are now back open. Minneapolis police say no arrests were made. 

Minnesota governor: Trump orders 'antithetical to our American values'

Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton is responding to recent executive orders signed by President Donald Trump, calling some of them “unconstitutional” and others “antithetical to our American values.”  READ THE FULL STATEMENT

Trump's executive order has Minnesota immigrant communities worried

One of the countries on the immigration black list is Somalia, causing confusion and fear among Minnesota’s large and growing Somali population.

"This is not going to make us safe,” said Jaylani Hussein, Executive Director of Minnesota’s Council on American-Islamic Relations. “The idea that this plan is going to make us safe, it's actually the opposite. It will fuel our enemies, give them propaganda."

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